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HK-trained specialists push for national team success

2024-06-08 HKT 08:09
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  • HK-trained specialists push for national team success
  • Davii Wang, a rugby technician, holds a master's degree in sports science and physical education from CUHK. Photo: RTHK
    Davii Wang, a rugby technician, holds a master's degree in sports science and physical education from CUHK. Photo: RTHK
With the Olympic Games less than two months away, dedicated Hong Kong-trained specialists are working tirelessly to ensure the country's elite athletes stay injury-free and perform at their very best in Paris.

For trainer Ivy Lui, a career highlight came when Liu Yang, one of the Chinese gymnasts she worked with, secured the gold medal on rings at last year’s World Championships in Antwerp.

“I felt like my dreams from graduation have come true,” she said. “I knew I wanted to help an athlete achieve an honour at the international stage.”

The gymnast also won gold in rings at the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, so he'll be defending his title in Paris.

Lui's journey as a sports therapist began eight years ago when she graduated from the Technological and Higher Education Institute of Hong Kong, a member institution of the Vocational Training Council.

After spending time with the Hong Kong Rugby Union, she began working with the gymnastics team in Guangzhou before joining the national gymnastics team.

Her days involve giving massages to the gymnasts, to help them relax after training sessions, and treating any injuries.

But her work goes beyond physical therapy.

“To ensure comprehensive preparation, we also recreate a live atmosphere and simulate actual playing time during our gym training sessions in China before going overseas,” she said.

Another dedicated professional Davii Wang, a rugby technician, holds a master's degree in sports science and physical education from the Chinese University.

Wang was already working with the national rugby team before he went on to pursue an advanced degree in Hong Kong, so he would have a deeper understanding of the field.

“The one-year study made my work more systematic,” he explained.

“For example, we use force platforms to test athletes, which can indicate whether there’s discrepancy in their leg strength.

“If there is a big discrepancy, we will strengthen the weaker leg to prevent injuries.”

One of Wang's key tasks is to make sure China's men and women rugby teams stay in top form, as they try to book a ticket to Paris through a qualification tournament later this month.

HK-trained specialists push for national team success