Warning flags become a cone job during TST march - RTHK
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Warning flags become a cone job during TST march

2019-10-12 HKT 20:47
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  • Warning flags become a cone job during TST march
  • The warning flags were placed a few metres away from the road, making it difficult to see. Photo: RTHK
    The warning flags were placed a few metres away from the road, making it difficult to see. Photo: RTHK
  • After the warning flags were removed, the cones remained in position. Photo: RTHK
    After the warning flags were removed, the cones remained in position. Photo: RTHK
One common sight in Hong Kong during the last few months is police officers raising warning flags, before they use force to disperse protesters taking part in unlawful events.

But as the protests against the government entered the 19th weekend, police resources seemed to be stretched thin.

During an unauthorised march in Tsim Sha Tsui on Saturday, police apparently outsourced the task of raising the warning banners – to two traffic cones.

The cones were placed inside the Tsim Sha Tsui police station compound; propped on them was a blue warning banner which informed those walking past that their assembly was illegal and they should disperse.

Many protesters who marched past the station along Nathan Road didn’t seem to have noticed the warning placed at one of the entrances to the premises. The fact they were situated a fair distance from the road and that plants obscured the view didn't help the cones with their task either.

But undeterred, officers did change the banner to the next level of warning after a while, replacing the blue one with black banner, warning people of tear gas.

Lau, a passer-by, said she couldn’t see the point of the police hiding the warning banners behind the police station’s gates.

"I think it is ridiculous," she said breaking into a laugh. "If you want to put a warning flag, put it on the road."

"There are plants and stuff that cover the flag and not many people can see it," she said.

After the march ended without any clashes, the banner was removed by the officers, leaving the two cones standing tall having done their part to maintain law and order.