'New law would cover foreign political exchanges' - RTHK
A A A
Temperature Humidity
News Archive Can search within past 12 months

'New law would cover foreign political exchanges'

2020-06-16 HKT 16:42
Share this story facebook
  • The security secretary says the new law will clearly stipulate what's allowed and what's not when local leaders hold talks in foreign countries. Photo: RTHK
    The security secretary says the new law will clearly stipulate what's allowed and what's not when local leaders hold talks in foreign countries. Photo: RTHK
Priscilla Ng reports
Security Secretary John Lee said on Tuesday that he believes the new security law that Beijing is preparing for Hong Kong, will have clear stipulations over what political leaders can and can’t do when travelling outside to meet dignitaries and officials there.

Hong Kong politicians, especially those from the pro-democracy camp, have traditionally travelled overseas to meet diplomats as well as government officials there to discuss SAR issues.

During an exclusive interview with RTHK, Lee said international exchanges are common, but some people have openly invited foreign interference by asking governments there to impose sanctions on Hong Kong.

"They've also been able to secure appointments with people whom even SAR government officials aren't able to meet", Lee said, adding that the future law will clearly stipulate what's allowed and what's not.

The security secretary said it will be clearly defined what kind of actions during such engagements would breach the law.

Lee rejected concerns about the effect of the law on freedoms in the city, saying some people have raised unfounded concerns over this.

For instance, he said, even though some people had previously suggested that the joint immigration arrangement at the West Kowloon high speed rail terminus could lead to the abduction of Hong Kong people to the mainland, that clearly didn't happen.

About the implementation of the new law once it is drawn up, Lee said SAR officials are ready to get cracking.

While the police force will be responsible for law enforcement, he said the government may also invite officers from other disciplinary forces to take part.

The security chief added that mainland agents authorised to work in Hong Kong will strictly abide by local laws and One Country Two Systems.

When asked if the Hong Kong police would be subservient to the mainland agents, Lee simply reiterated that enforcement work will be carried out by the force, while the Department of Justice will be responsible for prosecution work.