Schools, internet, foreigners, caught up in new law - RTHK
A A A
Temperature Humidity
News Archive Can search within past 12 months

Schools, internet, foreigners, caught up in new law

2020-07-01 HKT 01:23
Share this story facebook
  • The law stipulates the need to strengthen guidance, supervision and regulation of schools, social organisations, the media and the internet. Image: Shutterstock
    The law stipulates the need to strengthen guidance, supervision and regulation of schools, social organisations, the media and the internet. Image: Shutterstock
The sweeping new national security law appears to augur fundamental changes in Hong Kong, affecting not only people in the territory who violate the new legislation, but even internet users, students, and foreigners who’re not even in the SAR.

The legislation extends far beyond Hong Kong’s borders, with Article 38 specifying that it applies to anyone – including people who aren’t permanent Hong Kong residents – who violate the legislation even outside of the SAR.

If foreigners are deemed to have violated the laws while in the SAR, the law says they can be deported if the authorities decide not to prosecute them to the full extent of the legislation.

And it’s not just people that the law covers – Article 37 states that any company, group or organisation established in Hong Kong falls under its ambit.

But this law promises changes for even those who on the surface appear to have nothing to do with national security.

The legislation stipulates that the local education system, as well as the media and the internet will be regulated to strengthen national security, and rein in terrorist activities.

Article 9 of the legislation says the SAR government has to “take necessary measures to strengthen public communication, guidance, supervision and regulation” of schools, social organisations, the media and the internet.

How exactly the authorities could do this was left unsaid.

But the subsequent article, said the government should also use schools, social organisations, the media and the internet to introduce national security education, to strengthen people’s understanding of the need to abide by the law.

The law also requires the Chief Executive to submit a report to the Central People’s Government every year to update mainland authorities on the SAR government’s progress in implementing its duties.